Unit 1, Lister House Health Centre, Abercrombie Way, Harlow, Essex, CM18 6YJ

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Telephone: 01279 639 791 ( Out of Hours: 111 )

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Repeat Prescriptions

Please note that our repeat prescribing service is for those patients currently registered at the Lister Medical Centre. Only those items listed on your white reorder form are regarded as "repeat items"; you must see a doctor to obtain any item not listed there.

Your prescription will usually be ready two full working days after the receipt of your request. Please note your Pharmacist may take longer to fill your prescription.

It is YOUR responsibility to ensure that you order in good time before you run out of supplies; especially near a Bank Holiday as the pharmacies may be closed.


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PRESCRIPTIONS

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Other Ways to Order Your Prescriptions

  1. Pharmacy:
    Some of the local pharmacies also offer a collection service for the surgery. See Collection points and Electronic Repeat Dispensing sections below.
  2. Ordering Repeat Prescriptions in Person

    To order a repeat prescription in person, simply bring the repeat prescription order form to Lister Medical Centre and put it in the "Post Box" in the foyer. If the prescription is brought in by midday, we endeavour to generate the prescription within 48 hours and usually that evening (after 5pm). However, a same day prescription cannot be guaranteed, especially if your own doctor is off that day or on holiday or at a time when the surgery is busy. If the surgery is closed put your request in the post box adjacent to the main entrance.

    If you do not have a repeat prescription order form but believe you are entitled or need a repeat prescription, please complete a pink order form found on the counter or by asking a receptionist. Under these circumstances the request will be passed on to the doctor who will decide if the prescription is needed. If so, it will be issued within 72 hours. Alternatively, the patient will be invited to see the doctor in surgery to discuss the request. Obviously, it is incumbent on you to ensure you have enough medication to last until you can expect to receive your new supplies.

  3. By Post:

    Patients who have a repeat prescription card can order their repeat medication, as required, by post. Patients are expected to send their request to the surgery along with a stamped self addressed envelope.

    Prescriptions are generated the day the request is received (morning post only). We try to post the prescription back to the sender that night where possible. Obviously this method of requesting a repeat prescription is slow and depends on Royal Mail. It is incumbent on patients to ensure they have sufficient medication until the repeat is likely to be returned.

The surgery does not accept repeat prescription requests over the telephone. The surgery is extremely busy at all times and to accept requests in this way would "block" the switchboard.

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Collection Points

Patients can either collect their prescription from the surgery or a chemist of their choice.

In order for prescriptions to be collected from a chemist, patients need to register at their chemist of choice for the 'Prescription Collection Service'. Once the Chemist has agreed to collection on your behalf, Patients then need to instruct the Practice which must be in writing - forms are available from most chemists.

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Electronic Repeat Dispensing

If you or someone you care for uses the same medicines regularly, you may be able to benefit from electronic repeat prescriptions. This means you won't have to reorder or collect your repeat prescriptions from your GP practice every time you need more medicine.

Step 1

Talk to your GP or the person who prescribes your medicines and ask them if you can use electronic repeat prescriptions. Your prescriber will usually be your doctor or practice nurse.

If your prescriber thinks that you could use electronic repeat prescriptions for your regular medicines, they will ask you for permission to share information about your treatment with your pharmacist. This will help your pharmacist to give your prescriber feedback about your treatment and provide you with useful advice.

Your GP or prescriber will then authorise a number of electronic repeat prescriptions. This will be based on your circumstances and clinical need. These electronic repeat prescriptions will then be supplied to you by your pharmacy at regular intervals.

Step 2

Collect your first electronic repeat prescription from your pharmacy.

Step 3

When you need more medicines, go back to your pharmacy. Before dispensing the next issue of your prescription, your pharmacy will ask:

  • have you seen any health professionals (GP, nurse or hospital doctor), since your last repeat prescription was supplied?
  • have you recently started taking any new medicines, either on prescription or that you have bought over the counter?
  • have you been having any problems with your medication or experiencing any side effects?
  • are there any items on your repeat prescription that you don't need this month?

If you don't need all of the medicines on your prescription, let the pharmacy staff know, so that they only supply the medicines you need. This will help to reduce waste and save the NHS money.

Step 4

When your pharmacy supplies your final electronic repeat prescription in the series that your GP has authorised, they will advise you to contact your GP practice. Your doctor or practice nurse may want to see you to review your medication before they will authorise more electronic repeat prescriptions.

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Medications that cannot be ordered on Repeat Prescription

  • Warfarin. We need to see your hospital INR anticoagulant booklet
  • Diazepam and related preparations
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
  • The Contraceptive Pill
  • Medication where the number of renewals has expired
  • Medication that has not been requested for a long time
  • Medication not on your repeat prescription order form

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Free Prescriptions

Medicines are free to: pensioners, children under 16, people under 19 years old and in full time education, pregnant or nursing mothers, and people suffering from one of a number of specified individual conditions, people on income support or family credit.

See NHS prescription charges for further information.